band

The Parrots

Interview: The Parrots

960 690 fringereview

All the way from Madrid are the garage purists, The Parrots. From the same recording label as Hooton Tennis Club, H.Hawkline and Stealing Sheep – previous performers at the Fringe – this latest VIF band maintain a unsullied mid-late 60s sound.

Imagine: A party fifty years ago, 13th Floor Elevators and The Troggs have been talking a while and drunkenly stumble upstairs to find a room. A few songs are sung, a bed is broken and a few months later a baby is born. A messy custody battle pursues, the adolescent matures and 20 years later bumps into tall, dark and handsome, Black Lips, at a bar in Madrid. One thing leads to another (wow, garage bands have high libidos) and nine months down the line The Parrots are born.

We asked the guys some questions a few weeks before the Fringe and this was their response…

We’re super excited to have you guys coming over to the Isle of Wight. Have you ever visited before? Do you know anything about the Island?
Yeah, Diego stayed in Newport and Ryde for three weeks a long time ago, he loved it!

You’re based in Madrid but have now played lots of shows here in the UK, how do audiences and gigs compare between the two countries?
In the UK people go to shows with the idea of listening to the songs and watch a good performance, while in Spain people kind of want to get crazy and party as much as they can, but everyday they look more similar and now we can’t really tell the difference.

You’re signed to one of our favourite labels Heavenly Records, how did that relationship come about?
It was a long thing before we signed with them, but I think that made us feel more close and also sure that we wanted to sign with them. They came to a show and, being honest, it was a complete mess. Nothing came out as planned, no sound engineer so we had lots of problems. But it was fun and then they were again on the next show so we started talking and realised we wanted to do something together.

What’s next for you guys? Do you have any plans for a second album?
Yes, we just finished touring and we already have some new songs, so the idea is to use those and write a lot more so the next album comes very soon.

How would you describe your music in three words?
Mayhem, sangria and raw.

Are there any other Spanish bands you think we should be listening to?
Of course! Los Nastys, Joe Crepusculo and Favx.

Childhood

614 614 fringereview

The first memory I had as a child was of something I thought could have been a dream – nah I’m only joking; I’m reviewing Childhood THE BAND.

Playing this Friday at Ventnor Winter Gardens is the London-based band Childhood. Though listening to their back catalogue, you could be forgiven for thinking these guys were from a seaside town, not too dissimilar from dear Ventnor here.

The band were welcomed to the scene back in 2012 with their single Blue Velvet, and were admired as the revivalists of modern guitar music. Such notoriety for a young band meant that Childhood had to either continue in this fashion, or fall by the wayside.

In 2014 they released their album, Lacuna, which did not disappoint. The album showed off more of what critics had grown to love from Childhood, presenting exciting exploratory guitar on catchy synth indie-pop tracks.

Their latest album Universal High boast a Motown soul sound, a surprising turn around given their first album (Lacuna) featured indie-pop-psychedelia. The latest album asserts crisp funky guitar riffs, the appearance of falsetto vocals whilst maintaining a soft undercurrent of that familiar psychedelic surfer guitar we’ve come to know and love.

Too Old for My Tears has got to be the dance track of the summer; not the title you’d imagine for an up-beat summer anthem, but it’ll really get you up and wanting to dance. If you’re wondering which song you’re thinking of when the chorus plays “But oh baby” – It’s Ronan Keating, ‘Life is a Rollercoaster’ (you’re welcome, because we know that woulda’ been playing on your mind. And for all you nay-sayers, there’s nothing wrong with a bit of Ronan). This fast-paced song is like a blend of ‘Black and White Town’ by Doves crossed with Julian Casablacas-esque vocals.

It’s an eclectic album – the more you listen, the more you unlock. It’s been a while since I’ve heard an album like it. Something new resonates with you with every play, whether it’s the bass-line, various guitar accompaniments or varying vocal styles, it’s just an astute collection of songs. My most exciting encounter with the album was the title track, embracing similar sounds to that of Connan Mockasin, minus the obscure and down-right weird lyricism.

Childhood have taken several traditional music genres, amalgamated them into their own, and it’s that what a great album should be. The bands new image emanates the classic swinging flared corduroys, bushy side-burned beatnik boys.

This definitely is a must see for any music fanatics this week. Whether you’ve given them a listen already or would prefer to be pleasantly surprised, a live set is always the true measure of a band.

X